Let’s Count Our Blessings on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving Day Greetings

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As we approach another Thanksgiving Day, let us give thanks. We are blessed with a great nation, even with its many faults and failings. As a country and as a people, we are better off in the things that matter.

We have peace in our land. We have warm homes and food on our tables. Granted, there are many who do not have these necessities and comforts. But we are a compassionate people, and as a whole, give a great deal of money and goods to needy causes. When there are tornadoes and hurricans, efforts are made to help out our neighbors. It is said that Americans give more money to charity than the rest of the world combined.

Children and families can practice care and concern for others in their own corner of the world. This could be something as simple as a smile or kind word. Even small ways of being helpful to others can make a difference in someone’s life.

We are thankful for our family and friends, each with with its own special joys, satisfactions, and challenges. We’re thankful for the opportunity of being together, especially at holidays.

The men and women serving our country deserve a multitude of thanks for helping protect us and defend our freedom. We remember military families who are missing loved ones from their tables this Thanksgiving.

I want to offer an expression of gratitude to you for being here with me on this journey, and for all the ways you continue to contribute to the world with the gifts and blessings that are you.

Let us give thanks for all our many blessings from Thy bounty and ask God to continue to bless America.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Lee Jackson

 

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Giving Thanks and Gratitude for Another Bountiful Year

The First Thanksgiving, painted by Jean Leon G...

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Just as early Americans were thankful for surviving that first winter, let us also show thanks and gratitude for all we have received.

There seems to be more of an emphasis on Black Friday this season than on giving thanks for all the good things God has given us. Instead of wanting more and more “stuff”, let’s give thanks for all we have this Thanksgiving Day and everyday.

What are you thankful for? Family, friends? Warm home? Food? Clothes? Good health? Talents? Abilities? Connections? Sky, moon, stars? Trees, flowers, grass, sun?

Give thanks to God the Lord; upon His Name now call.
Make known among the people on earth what He has done for all.
Sing praise to Him, now sing; His wondrous acts proclaim.
Rejoice, all you who seek the Lord; come glory in His Name.

Lyrics by Susan H. Peterson

May you have a blessed Thanksgiving.

Best to you and your family,

Lee Jackson
Food and family living author

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Tips for a Happy Thanksgiving Day With Your Family

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In preparation for Thanksgiving, here are some tips to help you have a happy day with your family by guest Ivana Pejakovic .

Without a doubt Thanksgiving is a day that ought to be filled with hope, gratitude, and happiness. It is a time of togetherness and for appreciation of our family and friends. It is a day to be celebrated in joy and liveliness.

Although this day is great on its own, it is possible to enhance the day for your family. There are many things that can make your Thanksgiving holiday exceptional. Your kids watch and notice much of what you do. How you talk about your family, the attitude you have about this special day and life in general is all being recorded by your kids.

As such this article is intended for parents to examine how they are currently celebrating the day and to find tips that can enhance this experience with their family.

Here are a few ideas to get you started:

Begin with a thankful mindset: Start the day off with a happy and thankful attitude. You can ask all family members to write down one positive thing about each of the other family members they are grateful for. Decide to read these notes out loud when you are together at the dinner.

Cook together & eat together: Cooking and eating are important for human bonding. Sharing a meal with others is what makes the food even more enjoyable. This is an opportunity to share your daily experiences (the good and the bad) with those you love and those who love you the most. Thanksgiving Day, however, is a good time to share your gratitude with each other. When we share positive ideas with people we grow closer to them. Remember that food is more than just nutrition for the body and brain. It is nutrition for the mind and soul.

Celebrate the gift of life: Thanksgiving is the time to celebrate life, not only by saying “Thank You” but also by stepping out of the home to experience something fun (e.g., family sport game, hike, photography, picking wild flowers, appreciation of nature). Joy and happiness are the best vehicles to gratitude and a zest for life.

Build family connections: As adults, people recall many memories from their childhood years formed during family events. Many adults have great memories of “crazy Uncle George” or “eccentric Aunt Martha” which they speak about with their siblings and cousins. This is a good time to put aside any family disputes. Model good family relations to your children so they can grow up and value the relationships they have with their siblings and extended family.

Be thankful for your family: Much information exists on “How to survive the holidays with your family.” Nobody’s family is perfect and most of us have a family member that is difficult to get along with. Use Thanksgiving Day to remember all the positives about everyone and to recall all the positives they have done for you. Find a subtle way to tell everyone what you appreciate about this family member and watch his or her attitude change that night. This is a great opportunity to show your kids how family can connect.

Volunteer: Give some of your family’s time to a shelter or food bank. This is good for the kids and it is good for you. You will come home with a feeling of contribution, a greater gratitude for what you have, and with feelings of humility. This helps keep us all grounded, but it helps kids form a positive attitude about the life they were given, and it can show kids how their actions can make a difference in their community.

New and old tradition: Sometimes it’s just easier not to cook the traditional favourites or put up the decorations. But believe it or not, these little, seemingly unimportant traditions are what we crave and what we remember from our youth. Celebrate your yearly traditions and think about developing a new tradition that incorporates the uniqueness of your family! As a family unit, what is your strength and what are your interests (e.g., using arts and crafts, visually represent what each of you is thankful for)? Use your family’s uniqueness to establish a new yearly ritual.

Happy and Safe Thanksgiving to your family!

Ivana motivates teens and adults in their 20s to approach life with desire, confidence, and passion.

Ivana also works with the following cases:

* Low motivation

* Stress & time management

* Anger management

* Social skills

* And more…

Life coaching is the perfect gift for your teen or young adult. It provides your child with an early start at success!

Ivana Pejakovic, B.Sc., MA

ivana@lifecoachintoronto.com

http://www.lifecoachintoronto.com

Article Source:  Tips for a Happy Thanksgiving Day With Your Family

Article Source: Ezinearticles.com

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Keep Thanksgiving Food Safe

Thanksgiving Feast

Image by Matthew Bietz via Flickr

Enjoy your feast tomorrow – remember to keep it safe.

  • Always keep hot foods hot – above 140 degrees and cold foods cold, below 40 degrees F.
  • Don’t partially cook meat, poultry or fish and complete the cooking the next day.
  • Best to bake the stuffing separate from the turkey.
  • Refrigerate leftovers promptly and reheat to at least 165 degrees F.
  • If eating at a restaurant and want to take left-overs home, refrigerate within two hours.
  • Be especially careful when taking home meats, egg products and dairy foods as these foods become easily infected with bacteria.
  • Be sure to reheat leftovers to 165 degrees before eating them.
  • Never taste any food that looks or smells questionable.

Be safe!

Lee Jackson

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Happy Independence Day Holiday!

American flag
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I’m proud to be an American. For all our faults and shortcomings, I feel blessed to live in a country free from tyranny and persecution. I value the freedoms we hold dear. May God continue to bless America, the home of the brave and the land of the free.

Lee Jackson, CFCS
Home and family living coach

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The Thanksgiving Legend of the Five Kernels

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Ask your children whether they have heard the legend of the five kernels. This legend is about the Pilgrims. The first winter the Pilgrims almost starved. It was very cold and they did not have enough food. Some days they had little to eat and had to share what they had with many people. Some days they ate only five kernels of corn. But then spring came, and the Pilgrims planted, hunted, and fished. The next winter there was more food. But they always put five kernels of corn on the table to remind them of their early struggles and their thankfulness for the more plentiful year.

In her book, Cooking Around the Calendar with Kids: Holiday and Seasonal Food and Fun, author Amy Houts says a friend gave her a gift of this legend. Her present was five kernels of candy corn in a zip-lock bag. Tucked inside the bag was this message:

The first kernel reminds us of the beauty of autumn.
The second kernel reminds us of the love in our family.
The third kernel reminds us of God’s love.
The fourth kernel reminds us of our friendship.
The fifth kernel reminds us of freedom.

You can ask your child, “What are you thankful for?” Together, try to think of five things for which you are thankful?

Hopefully, you and your child can think of many, many things for which you are thankful.

May you have a joy-filled Happy Thanksgiving!

Lee Jackson

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