Kids Learn to Cook (and So Much More!) Through Community Leadership and Planning

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See how one Ohio community gives foster children healthy lifestyle choices.

As basic cooking skills are often left to chance, fast foods and other quick fixes become the favored, but less healthy, choice. Here leaders team up to get kids involved in learning basic skills of cooking and how to prepare healthy food. The benefit is two-fold: exposing teens in foster care to positive women while they are learning a valuable life skill.

http://alturl.com/zhwb3

 

 

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Preschool Teachers & Home-School Parents – Get this E-Book on your Kindle

Filed under Cooking and kidsKids Cooking and Learning Through Food Activities

A new ebook has just been posted on Amazon.  Kids Cooking and Learning Through Food Activities by Amy Houts  is a Kindle edition filled with fun and educational activities.

These activities help children:

  • learn about nutrition
  • predict outcomes of temperature changes on food
  • learn math through cooking
  • learn about foods of different cultures
  • and introduce many other food related projects

Get this ebook on Kindle today. Have it to use tomorrow.

Be the first to review it. Tell your friends.

Preschool and kindergarten, home-schooling parents, families with young children – here is just what you need to get kids learning about the world of food.

 

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What to Do With All Those Apples?

Now, what are you going to do with all those apples? With hundreds of ways to enjoy apples, will you use them in pies, desserts, salads, breads, jellies, or other?

Following is a recipe for a super easy way to use apples in a coffee cake for Sunday morning breakfast or anytime. It’s from my apple cookbook, From the Apple Orchard – Recipes for Apple Lovers. Kids will enjoy making this simple but yummy and quick coffee cake.

APPLE BISCUIT COFFEE CAKE

2 cooking apples, peeled and sliced
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1/4 cup raisins
1 can refrigerated ready-to-bake biscuits

1/4 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 cup corn syrup
1 egg
1/4 cup walnuts
1 tablespoon butter or margarine

Melt 2 tablespoons butter in bottom of 9″ round cake pan. Arrange sliced apples over butter. Sprinkle raisins over apples. Cut each of the 10 biscuits into fourths and place over apples.

Mix together the brown sugar, cinnamon, corn syrup and egg until well blended and sugar is dissolved. Pour over biscuits. Sprinkle walnuts overtop. Dot with 1 tablespoon butter.

Bake at 350° for 35-45 minutes. An adult needs to invert on serving plate, spooning juices over top. Place larger plate over cake pan and invert – use hot pads and lots of care as it is hot and gooey and can be tricky.

Yield:   6-8 servings

Enjoy the fruit of the season!

Best to you,

Lee Jackson
Apple cookbook author: From the Apple Orchard – Recipes for Apple Lovers and
Apples, Apples Everywhere – Favorite Recipes From America’s Orchards

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Young Chefs as Food Critics, Food Writers, and Culinary Enthusiasts

Young Chef

Young Chef (Photo credit: Javier Delgado Esteban)

Interesting story and slideshow about 10 young cooks who already have promising culinary careers in their future. http://www.thedailymeal.com/10-most-famous-kid-critics-and-cooks

Kid can never start too young to get interested in food and cooking.

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12 Food-Related Kids Projects

Recipes

Here are 12 fun, food-related projects you and your children can work on this summer. This will help them further explore their interest in food and cooking. Who knows, your children’s skills and enthusiasm for working with food may be taken to another level.

Children can:

  • begin a food journal by listing favorite foods. Include best food and holiday memories.
  • plan certain meals or menus for a week, then note results in journal.
  • collect favorite recipes and create own cookbook.
  • take a field trip to the farmers market with family.
  • grow radishes, green onions, and/or lettuce.
  • learn new cooking skill, such as how to cream, whip, or knead.
  • find recipes to try from different cookbooks.
  • make a list of proper table etiquette and include in journal.
  • clip coupons from newspapers and magazines.
  • sketch out the grocery store’s layout to help know where items are located.
  • when shopping, compare organic food prices to other food prices. Discuss advantages and disadvantages.
  • try some dishes with a regional or international flavor.

Here I have included a seafood recipe taken from the cookbook, Cooking Around the Country with Kids: USA Regional Recipes and Food Activities by Amy Houts. Her cookbook shows how different cultures in America came to co-exist, yet continue to celebrate their uniqueness through food. This recipe comes from the section on “Cooking in New England“, which describes the region and includes recipes from the  breads, soups and salads (like Manhattan Clam Chowder), main dishes/meats, vegetables and side dishes (such as Boston Baked Beans), and dessert categories.

Shake and Bake Scallops

1 egg
1 pound fresh scallops or 1 pound package frozen scallops, thawed
2/3 cup seasoned bread crumbs
2 tablespoons butter, melted

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Butter a 9-by-13-by-2-inch pan. Children can beat egg in a medium-sized bowl. Add scallops and stir until coated with egg. Measure bread crumbs and pour into a gallon-size zip-top plastic bag. Using a slotted spoon, scoop scallops into bag with crumbs. Pour into prepared pan in one layer. Drizzle with butter. Bake for 15 minutes, until lightly browned.

Variation

Peel and chop 1 small onion. Seed, rinse, and chop 1 small green pepper. Rinse and chop 1 rub celery. Saute onion, pepper, and celery in a skillet on medium heat for 5 minutes. After drizzling breaded scallops with butter, top with vegetables. Bake as directed above. Serves 4.

One way to keep children active and interested this summer is through food focused activities. Let this be the start of an engaging summer.

To your health and that of your family,

Lee Jackson, CFCS

http://www.imagesunlimitedpub.com

Books for kids, families, and parenting professionals

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3 Best Ways to Get Kids Cooking

Do your children like to help in the kitchen? Have you asked them and encouraged them?

Most children love to “help” in the kitchen. This help may not always be appreciated but their enthusiasm should be encouraged. Being excited about working in the kitchen is a good trait for any child.

Here are three excellent ways to get kids cooking:

1. The #1 way to get kids cooking is to encourage and involve them in the work of the kitchen.  Give them simple chores to do, depending on the age of the child. Setting the table, mixing ingredients, and washing food, such as lettuce in a colander are jobs even preschoolers can do. It may take a little more time and patience sharing your kitchen with young ones, but the smiles on their faces will more than compensate for a little flour on the floor or other spills.

2. Give children choices. The #2 way of getting kids in the kitchen is to give them choices in what they can do. For example, “Do you want to grease the pan or measure the sugar?  Or you can ask “Would you like to put the napkins on the table or the silverware?” Eventually you may get them interested in doing both chores. Just make it sound interesting! Let them know this is a special job just for them. You may say: “You’re the only one in this family who knows where the knives, forks, and spoons go.”

3. Prepare simple foods with them and let them sample when it’s ready. Children feel good about the food they prepare and want to taste it. This is a good time to give them a little more information about the food. You can tell them where it is grown and some of the processes it went through to get to the stage it is now. Let them feel the food and talk about the color and the shape. What else do they know that is that color or that shape? How does it smell?  Is it hot or is it cold? When they taste it, is it salty? Is it sweet? Have them describe how it looks and tastes.

By following these suggestions you will have excited and willing help in the kitchen  –  perhaps even promising young chefs. Many great cooks attribute their skill and interest in cooking to their earlier years when they were encouraged to help their parents or other adults prepare food.

For help in selecting recipes to prepare with children, check out the children’s cookbook, Cooking Around the Country With Kids: USA Regional Recipes and Fun Activities by Amy Houts. This cookbook helps parents and children work together in celebrating America’s cultural diversity through foods from different regions of the country and shows where food is grown or harvested.

To your health and that of your family,

Lee Jackson
Nutrition Advocate
http://www.healthykidseatingtips.com

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WANT TO USE MY ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE?

You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it.

Copyright (C) 2012 www.cookingandkids.com Lee Jackson, CFCS  All rights reserved.

Childrens Cookbook Takes Kids Through the Seasons of the Year

You already know the importance of cooking with children – how much worthwhile information they gain from working in the kitchen. And why they need to be exposed to this skill at an early age.

Amy Houts, who has been a preschool teacher, now has a cookbook on cooking with children through the four seasons. Best of all, this hardcover childrens cookbook is incredibly priced. There is a special this week only for $16.95 when purchased through our website. This is a reduction from the regular price of $24.95 for this quality hardcover book. Amy said she wants every child to be able to cook with the seasons and sense the different rhythms of life.

http://ImagesUnlimitedPub.com

Cooking Around the Calendar with Kids – Holiday and Seasonal Food and Fun helps children enjoy the unique feeling and taste of each season. Now with the spring season knocking on our door, you will find many recipes for lighter and more colorful foods.

In the “Spring” section, there are recipes for foods using fresh strawberries, cool fruit parfaits, St. Patrick‘s Soda Bread, Spinach Power, Spring Flower Cake, Mexican fiesta food and other. There are over 200 kid-friendly recipes, many with a focus on different holidays and celebrations, but appropriate for any day of the year.

http://ImagesUnlimitedPub.com

Take a look and see if this is what you need to encourage your child to work in the kitchen and learn new skills.

To your health and that of your family’s,

Lee Jackson
Child nutrition advocate

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Getting Kids in the Kitchen – Preparing and Eating Food

It’s important that children not only learn to appreciate food, but also learn to cook for themselves. Even preschool children can learn how to help with meals and prepare or help cook simple foods.

Teaching children to cook is probably the best way to get kids to eat right and respect food. The whole point of getting them in the kitchen and involved is to get them to feel and taste the food. Let them use their sense of smell, taste, and touch. Children need to be exposed to different foods several times before they will taste it. Preparing it themselves increases their interest and desire to try it.

Children love the experience of mixing, stirring, and chopping, depending on age. Let them discover the joy of creating delicious, healthy dishes by encouraging them to help you.

One of the easiest and quickest ways to get dinner going with your young help, is to work together preparing roasted vegetables. For this you and the children scrub the vegetables well and then cut them up into about same-size pieces. This can be foods such as potatoes (white or sweet), carrots, onion, garlic, green and red pepper, celery, mushrooms, squash, broccoli and others.

Then the children can dribble a little virgin olive oil over them, stir well to distribute the oil, and splash a little balsamic vinegar over them, along with a little salt and fresh ground pepper.

Spread them in a single layer on a cookie sheet or other large flat pan. Roast in 425 degree oven for about 30 minutes.

Using a long handled spatula, you need to stir them periodically to keep them from sticking to the bottom.

They will come out with a nice dark color, perhaps more brown in places, but crispy, and oh, so good.

Even though you start with a large quantity of vegetables, the children will be amazed how much  smaller the portion is after roasting. Take time to explain here the reason for this.

Grilled vegetables

You may want to add a protein to the meal, such as cooked chicken, hamburger, or roast beef. Or you can just sprinkle shredded Parmesan or Cheddar cheese over the vegetables and you and your helpers have just prepared a one dish meal for your family.

Let’s stay healthy,

Lee Jackson
Child nutrition advocate, author
http://www.HealthyEatingTips.com
http://www.ImagesUnlimitedPub.com

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Veggie Recipe for Kids

English: A pack of organic cherry tomatoes, fr...

Image via Wikipedia

Vegetables have received a bad rap when it comes to being accepted by kids. But what other food is as colorful and as varied in taste and texture as vegetables? As parents we need to get across to kids that vegetables are really a most interesting and colorful food.

The way vegetables are presented and talked about in the family makes a real difference. If big brother or sister says that some food is yucky, then chances are, that is what the younger child believes. It’s amazing what lasting effect words can have on children. Then there are the positive words you can use as well: It will make you grow big and strong. It will make your hair shine. It will give you rosy cheeks. What a difference words can make!

Here is a recipe from the childrens cookbook, Cooking Around the Calendar with Kids – Holiday and Seasonal Food and Fun by Amy Houts, that shows kids just how good and juicy and fun vegetables can be – if you believe tomatoes are a vegetable, otherwise, go with the fruit definition. Botanically, a tomato is a fruit; however, it has a much lower sugar content than other fruits, and is therefore not as sweet. It is considered a vegetable for most culinary purposes.

Cherry Tomatoes with Dip

Cherry tomatoes

Dip:
1/2 cup plain yogurt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1 teaspoon dried minced onion
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon celery seed
1 teaspoon seasoning salt

Combine all ingredients for dip in a bowl. Mix until smooth. Cover bowl and refrigerate for several hours or overnight.

When ready to eat, wash tomatoes and cut in half. Stick a toothpick into the tomato. Give each child a small container of dip.

You can also use carrot and celery sticks, cauliflower or broccoli, or other vegetable with this dip. If children are very young, you will need to cook the vegetable a short time to soften them slightly.

Let’s keep them healthy,

Lee Jackson
Child nutrition advocate, author
http://www.healthykidseatingtips.com

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After-School Snack Ideas

Here are a couple more snack ideas that missed the deadline for making it into the ebook, How to Solve Your Child’s Munchie Time the Healthy Way – with Easy Recipes and Ideas. Hope you will enjoy.

Tortilla Treats

Flour Tortillas with Spicy Beef
Flour Tortillas with Spicy Beef (Photo credit: mars!)

1 (7-inch) soft tortilla
1/2 teaspoon Dijon or other mustard
1/3 cup grated Cheddar cheese
1 green onion, sliced

Spread mustard on tortilla. Sprinkle with cheese and onion. Heat in pan until cheese has melted and then roll up. Or you can roll up and wrap in foil. Bake at 350 F for 10 minutes. Cut in half. Dip in salsa.

“Personal” Trail Mix

1 cup oat cereal such as Cherrios
1/2 cup whole-wheat pretzels
1 cup small cheese crackers
1/2 cup chopped walnuts or peanuts
8 oz. sunflower seeds
1/4 cup dried cranberries

Mix, pack in little baggies, or store in air-tight container, and you’re set.

Order the ebook How to Solve Your Child’s Munchie Time the Healthy Way – with Easy Recipes and Ideas here and add these recipes to your snack list.

Let’s stay healthy,

Lee Jackson
Child nutrition advocate, author
http://healthykidseatingtips.com/home/

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