Pumpkin Bread for the Season

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300px Pumpkin bread Pumpkin Bread for the Season

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Pumpkin bread is one of my favorite breads to have on hand during the fall season and on into the holidays. It combines the mellow pumpkin flavor with cinnamon and nuts for a great fall flavor.

Bread baked in the  smaller miniature loaves are great for gift giving. Children like to make cupcakes using this recipe. Just  pour batter into muffin tins about two-thirds full and viola..a tasty snack.

Pumpkin Bread

3 1/3 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 cup vegetable oil
4 eggs
1/3 cup milk or water
2 cups (16 oz. can) pumpkin
3 cups sugar
1/2 cup chopped nuts

In large bowl, mix the flour, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon; add the rest of ingredients. Mix well. Stir in nuts. Fill two well-greased 9 x 5-inch loaf pans one-half full. Bake in 350 degrees oven for 60 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Leave in pan for 15 minutes, then turn out on cooling rack.

Makes 2 loaves

This bread is high in sugar and oil so keep the slices thin and without butter!  But pumpkin is loaded with much
nutritional value and I like to think the high sugar and oil consequences are overshadowed somewhat by the
pumpkin’s nutrients! Again, moderation is the key.

The bright orange color of pumpkin is a dead giveaway that pumpkin is loaded with an important antioxidant,
beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is one of the plant carotenoids converted to vitamin A in the body. In the conversion to vitamin A, beta carotene performs many important functions in overall health.

Current research indicates that food containing beta-carotene may reduce the risk of developing certain types of
cancer and offers protection against heart disease. It has also shown to be effective against the degenerative aspects of aging.

Here are the nutrition facts for 1 cup cooked, boiled, drained, pumpkin without salt:
Calories 49
Protein 2 grams
Carbohydrate 12 grams
Dietary Fiber 3 grams
Calcium 37 mg
Iron 1.4 mg
Magnesium 22 mg
Potassium 564 mg
Zinc 1 mg
Selenium .50 mg
Vitamin C 12 mg
Niacin 1 mg
Folate 21 mcg
Vitamin A 2650 IU
Vitamin E 3 mg

This is the wonderful season of glorious colors and tempting foods.

May you enjoy good, healthy foods.

Lee Jackson
Books for cooks and apple lovers
children, families and parenting professionals
http://www.imagesunlimitedpub.com

 Pumpkin Bread for the Season
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Corn Bread Baking Time

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38121127 8ea9f765a5 m Corn Bread Baking Time

Image by @jozjozjoz via Flickr

On an icy, wind-swept New Year‘s eve, what could warm your heart and stomach more than some hot crusty corn bread? The following recipe is a perfect accompaniment to the black-eyed peas we started yesterday.

Crusty Corn Bread

1 1/4 cups flour
3/4 cup white corn meal
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup milk
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1 egg, beaten

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Grease an 8 or 9-inch pan.

Children can measure flour, corn meal, sugar, baking powder and salt into a medium-sized bowl.

Make a well in the center and add milk, oil and egg. Mix just until dry ingredients are moistened, about 50 strokes.

Pour into prepared pan. Bake 20-25 minutes or until light brown. Cut into 9 slices or square. Best served warm with a dab of butter.

Yield:  9 servings

Hope you enjoy the hot bread. You can refer to this and other seasonal recipes in Amy Hout’s  childrens cookbook, Cooking Around the Country with Kids: Holiday and Seasonal Food and Fun.

I wish you a happy and prosperous New Year, filled with many blessings. See you in 2011!

Best to you,

Lee Jackson
Family Life Issues Coach

 Corn Bread Baking Time
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Harvest Pumpkin Bread

PinExt Harvest Pumpkin Bread
294107348 24412133eb m Harvest Pumpkin Bread
Image by Kristin Brenemen via Flickr

What do you serve drop-in family and friends when they stop by your house this season? Here is an easy entertaining idea that is sure to please your guests. It is one of my favorite breads to have on hand during the fall season and on into the holidays. Pumpkin Bread has been my mainsty for a number of years. It combines the mellow pumpkin flavor with cinnamon and nuts, plus, it freezes well. You can make it into smaller miniature loaves for gift
giving if you want. Children like to make it into cupcakes. Simply pour the batter into muffin tins about two-thirds
full.

Pumpkin Bread

3 1/3 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 cup vegetable oil
4 eggs
1/3 cup milk or water
2 cups (16 oz. can) pumpkin
3 cups sugar
1/2 cup chopped nuts

In large bowl, mix the flour, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon; add the rest of ingredients. Mix well. Stir in nuts. Fill
two well-greased 9 x 5-inch loaf pans one-half full. Bake in 350 degrees oven for 60 minutes, or until a toothpick
inserted in the center comes out clean. Leave in pan for 15 minutes, then turn out on cooling rack.

Makes 2 loaves

This bread is high in sugar and oil so keep those slices thin and without butter!  But pumpkin is loaded with much
nutritional value and I like to think the high sugar and oil consequences are overshadowed somewhat by the
pumpkin’s nutrients! Again, moderation is the key.

The bright orange color of pumpkin is a dead giveaway that pumpkin is loaded with an important antioxidant,
beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is one of the plant carotenoids converted to vitamin A in the body. In the conversion to
vitamin A, beta carotene performs many important functions in overall health.

Current research indicates that food containing beta-carotene may reduce the risk of developing certain types of
cancer and offers protection against heart disease. It has also shown to be effective against the degenerative aspects
of aging.

Here are the nutrition facts for 1 cup cooked, boiled, drained, without salt pumpkin:
Calories 49
Protein 2 grams
Carbohydrate 12 grams
Dietary Fiber 3 grams
Calcium 37 mg
Iron 1.4 mg
Magnesium 22 mg
Potassium 564 mg
Zinc 1 mg
Selenium .50 mg
Vitamin C 12 mg
Niacin 1 mg
Folate 21 mcg
Vitamin A 2650 IU
Vitamin E 3 mg

Just a little pumpkin trivia: Pumpkins range in size from less than a pound to over 1,000 pounds. The largest
pumpkin ever grown weighed 1,140 pounds. That would make quite a few pies! The largest pumpkin pie ever made
was over five feet in diameter and weighed over 350 pounds. It used 80 pounds of cooked pumpkin, 36 pounds of
sugar, 12 dozen eggs and took six hours to bake. I have one question: Why would anyone want to do this? Other
thoughts also linger with me — who will eat this and is good food being wasted?  Remember, pumpkin pie should be
refrigerated.

May you enjoy good, healthy food.

Lee Jackson
Books for cooks and apple lovers
children, families and parenting professionals

http://www.imagesunlimitedpub.com

 Harvest Pumpkin Bread
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Celebration Foods

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dscn06413 225x300 Celebration Foods

I have just come back from Kansas City where I attended my grandson’s confirmation at Our Lady of Presentation Church. It was a very beautiful and inspiring ceremony with Bishop Finn presiding. Over 80 young people were confirmed in the Catholic faith.

Alongwith ceremonies, there are usually guests. And the guests came bearing food on Sunday. You may know that Kansas City is known for its barbeque beef. We did not have barbeque beef from a restaurant, though. A relative brought his own secret recipe barbeque with its special sauce and it was wonderful. This was probably the most flavorful, mouth-watering barbeque I had ever tasted. It was the epic barbeque experience.

I am trying to cut down or eliminate meat from my diet, but this was food to break rules over. Along with the barbeque we had baked beans, cole slaw, potato chips, assorted relishes, and mixed fruit in season. How much more mid-west summer can a family get-together be? Oh yes, there was key-lime pie for dessert later. It was a memorable day.

My only contribution food-wise, was to bring two loaves of poppyseed bread, which were served for breakfast. This is the recipe I would like to share with you.

Poppyseed Bread

3 cups flour
2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder (make sure it is no older than 6 months as it may not work if older)
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
3 eggs
1 1/2 cups milk
1 1/2 cups oil
1 1/2 teaspoon almond flavoring
1 1/2 teaspoon butter flavoring
3/4 cup poppyseed

Glaze:
Juice from 1 lemon
3/4 cup sugar
3/4 teaspoon almond flavoring
3/4 teaspoon butter flavoring

In large bowl, mix together dry ingredients except poppyseed. Beat eggs with hand mixer in separate bowl. Stir in milk, oil, and flavorings.

Make a well in dry ingredients and pour in the liguid. Beat until well blended and free from lumps. Stir in poppyseed.

Pour into 3 medium pans, 7 1/2 x 3 1/2-inch, or two large, greased and floured loaf pans. Bake in oven for 50-60 minutes, depending on size of pan. Tops will crack.

To make glaze, mix together all ingredients but do not cook. Let baked breads rest about 5 minutes, then poke holes in breads with fork or toothpick and pour glaze over breads in pans. Let cool 15 minutes and remove from pans to cool.

Enjoy!

Lee  Jackson

 Celebration Foods
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This is the Day to Cook

PinExt This is the Day to Cook

When I was a teacher in the classroom I remember how excited my students were when it was “the day we cook”! I remember the boys especially were very anxious to get going. Yes, ultimately they got to eat what they prepared, which I know was a huge drawing card, but they really relished the hands-on experience.making banana bread kh1 150x150 This is the Day to Cook

We had five unit kitchens in our foods lab with about 4 students in each kitchen. In both the middle school or high school setting, this meant that each student needed to know what to do and have his or her task clearly in mind.

There were some mishaps along the way, such as forgetting to take the plastic wrap off the pan before baking the food, or not turning the oven on, or leaving out an important ingredient. But there were more successes along the way. These included beautifully decorated cakes, crisp, attractive-looking and delicious salads, wonderful baked breads, and many foods they were proud to display and enjoyed eating.

Not only did they gain knowledge of nutrition and how to prepare different foods, but they learned many other skills, such as how to get along with others and how to communicate effectively. Working together helped them develop and improve their leadership skills and artistic skills.

It saddens me to know that many family and consumer sciences classes are being dropped from the curriculum due to time constraints. I realize students need good solid foundations in English, science, and math. I also like to think students need to develop skills in learning how to manage a home and handle family responsibilities. Being knowledgeable about preparing nutritious and tasty meals for the family is an important life skill. It is also good background for success in a food industry career.

To your positive impact on the work of the home,

Lee Jackson

 This is the Day to Cook
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Pre-School Kitchen Activities

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246188447 f2b9a08e72 m Pre School Kitchen Activities Image by panduh via Flickr

Most pre-school children love to “work” in the kitchen, just like grown-ups. Cooking with children can be a challenge, but it can also be a great experience for both child and adult.

Here are some jobs many preschoolers can do in the kitchen with a little supervision:

  • pre-measure ingredients for recipes
  • stir ingredients in a bowl
  • set the table
  • wash foods in a colander
  • core, tear and rinse lettuce
  • tear spinach
  • snap beans
  • shell peas
  • prepare garlic cloves
  • peel bananas
  • stem strawberries
  • pit cherries
  • peel oranges
  • knead dough
  • crack cooked eggs
  • beat with rotary beater
  • spread filling on bread
  • grease pans
  • cut dates with blunt scissors
  • cut soft foods using a rounded point knife, no paring knives

With a little help and encouragement, children can become competent and enthusiastic cooks.

Happy and healthy cooking with kids,

Chef Crombie

 Pre School Kitchen Activities
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